New Books at Lehi’s Library

These are books that I recently ordered online and I am eagerly waiting their arrival! Let me know if you have read any of them and what your thoughts were. You can click on the picture and it will send you to the Amazon page of that book (even though I actually bought them from Barnes and Noble).

library-bookssmaller

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6 comments on “New Books at Lehi’s Library

  1. Hans says:

    Haven’t read any of them but am eager to see your reviews. Please publish when you are done.

  2. Claiming Christ–I’d give it four out of five stars. I found myself a little disappointed in Millet at times in that he really could have landed some punches and didn’t.

    Oxford Bible Commentary–Interesting, but not as interesting as I hoped. I haven’t used it too much, however.

  3. Steve Smoot says:

    The Bible Unearthed is a good book. If anything, it serves as a warning against Evangelical Christians who would assume that the Bible has been verified archaeologically while simultaneously condemning the Book of Mormon for lack of archaeological evidence*.

    *Joel Kramer and Living Hope Ministries… I’m looking at you.

  4. Steve Smoot says:

    Also,

    Biblical Mormonism is okay… but it could be better in some areas. Hopkins over-states his argument about the role of Greek philosophy in early Christianity and describes some theological concepts (such as modalism) incorrectly.

  5. David Larsen says:

    If you want the most liberally biased book on archaeology you can find, read “The Bible Unearthed.” Finkelstein and Silberman don’t find evidence for virually anything that the Bible claims. For them, there was no Exodus, no conquest of Canaan, no kingdoms of David and Solomon, etc., etc. I, personally, would not recommend the book to anyone. The only redeeming virtue would be what S. Smoot mentions above–to show that there really isn’t as much consensus on archaeological evidences for the Bible as some would like to claim. The only other thing the book would serve for is to make unsuspecting (and less informed) readers begin to doubt their faith in the Bible.
    A much better biblical archaeologist to read would be William Dever–he’s not necessarily conservative in his views, but he is much more balanced than these guys.

  6. James says:

    Thanks for all of your input.

    “The Bible Unearthed” looks like a good read if only for the reasons that Andrew gave. I’m not looking for a faith-affirming read. I’m interested in knowing what various top scholars have to say. My favorite biblical archaologist author coincidentally is William Dever.

    The Oxford Bible Commentary is one I am really looking forward to. I used to go to Barnes and Noble and just read it in the store because I couldn’t afford it yet. I thought what I read was extremely useful, and I look forward to more.

    “Who Wrote the Bible” is a classic, I’ve been told. I want more information on the JEPD hypothesis than Wikipedia provides.

    The last two, “Claiming Christ” and “Biblical Mormonism” were chosen in the hope that I can learn a few good arguments to make. Every apologist has something useful to add, and none are perfect!

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